Deeply Subjective Music

For many artists, the 9-5 grind does not seem to fit into a creative life. Such is the case with musician Daniel Vibeage, who recently left his IT position to pursue his passion of creating, sharing and teaching electronic music to the masses. Just days after resigning, Daniel hit the ground running, developing a new set of goals, deadlines, and business plans, all to once again activate his dream of supporting his life with music.

His recently launched business, Deeply Subjective Music, is an attempt to market and sell a variety of musical offerings to sustain himself with music alone. Focusing primarily on electronic music education (both virtual and in person), Daniel has also diversified his portfolio via samples, templates and other custom content which can be purchased by music producers across the globe. By additionally offering sound design along with his his live performances, he has combined multiple avenues which together represent his quest towards self-sustainability. Yet, when one talks with him, it is clear that his vision is much larger than survival alone.


Daniel moved to the city of Baltimore seven years ago, but his interest in music began in his homeland of Garrett County (Western Maryland) when he was very young.  Isolated from almost everything, he grew up seeking ways to connect with himself and the world around him.  Subsequently, he began exploring music to subvert the boredom and find a sense of purpose. Feeling alone but fully engaged in his musical exploration, Daniel began creating. In one of a series of fortuitous events in his life, he met lifelong friend and collaborator Michael Folk – who lived just miles away and was equally dedicated to exploring the infinite potential of music.

In 2004, after working together for a few years, Daniel and Michael made it official, creating a project called Aligning Minds: “a unique and captivating collaboration of two producers using sound to achieve a mutual vision”.  Together, in the remote seclusion of Garrett County, they found a shared vision for their music and continued working. No longer alone, but still removed, they created endless tracks of music unlike much of what was going on at the time– blending and defying genres and taking influence from a wide range of musical sources.

Seeking an audience for their extremely personal endeavors, they spent a summer throwing a series of small festivals, called the Sound and Symbol Symposium in nearby Frostburg (which pulled less than 10 people per event). After the third Symposium, feeling disheartened and discouraged, they did what many artists do – went out for a drink.  It just so happened that this drink, on that night, would forever change the course of both of their lives.

You see, purely by synchronistic chance, the two friends had stumbled into a bar where Baltimore based band Telesma happened to be playing. Recognizing several of the same synthesizers they were using, the Aligning Minds duo struck up a conversation with band members Chris Mandra, Ian Hesford and Jason Sage – and immediately recognized their shared passion for music as well as similar ideas and methodologies.  Mandra, who was then organizing and promoting the notoriously diverse Def Dumb and Bass Freakout event at the now defunct venue ‘The Royal’ on Light Street, invited them to perform. For the first time Aligning Minds experienced a sense of community and like-minded reciprocation… and before long, Daniel decided to make the move.

Shortly after, Michael moved to Silver Spring, MD, and over the next few years Aligning Minds hit its stride, releasing numerous singles, remixes, and eventually a full length album on Israeli psy-dub label Aleph Zero/Beats and Pieces. The duo worked closely with electronic artistry collective 88DC and also embarked on two well received North American tours with fellow musical mavens, Kilowatts and The Great Mundane.

After a short hiatus from the partnership, Aligning Minds is back in full force, while both Daniel and Michael pursue individual projects as well.  Daniel’s latest solo project, Deep Subject, is “a fusion of future garage, IDM (Intelligent Dance Music) and psychedelic break-beats.” This project also provides the inspiration for the name of his new business, Deeply Subjective Music.

Deeply Subjective Music is Daniel’s attempt to do for others what he has successfully done for himself – finding and awakening their own musical voice.  By asking interested musicians to delve within and find their greatest musical desire, Daniel will call on his years of experience to provide personal instruction for those who wish to manifest it through the medium of electronic music.  Deeply Subjective Music will provide hands-on training for local artists, or alternatively, via Skype for those who may be out of the area or prefer a slightly more removed approach.

Daniel’s specific area of expertise is in the use of Ableton Live, an industry leading software package utilized for its versatility and functionality.  This application was first released in 2001, when Daniel first started employing it to realize his ideas.  It allows users to record, generate, manipulate and sequence sound in order to create original compositions that are “unlimited by the scope of imagination and musical vision,” utilizing synthesizers, samplers and effect algorithms.  This innovative software provides the backbone for most of Daniel’s work, which allows producers to use it not only in the studio but also in a live performance context, allowing the music to be played in an improvisational way.

In the spirit of diversification, personalized electronic music classes are but one of the services that will be available. Daniel has crafted a menu of offerings and ways to purchase and utilize his skills.  Available soon, there will also be sound design, instrument\effect racks, sample collections and custom Ableton Live templates to make any music producer’s life much easier. Combining over 12 years of experience, Daniel is confident that this new venture can truly assist electronic musicians of all skill levels looking to cultivate their music.

Daniel hopes to reach industry professionals who need assistance, as well as those who have just begun to dabble in the medium.  Furthermore, he sees that his services could also be of great value to those interested in utilizing sound design in other applications – such as art and sound installations.

In alignment with his overall goal, Deeply Subjective Music is setting up to be Baltimore’s place to go if you need help with sound and Daniel is more than up for the challenge.  His full vision entails opening and operating an electronic music education center in Baltimore – his own space with 10-15 pieces of identical hardware wherein an entire classroom of students could be taught and contribute to a shared learning experience.

While Deeply Subjective Music hopes to serve as “a beacon in the darkness for electronic music producers in Baltimore”, this business plan also thrives on its ability to provide services globally by utilizing the advances of remote pc control and shared workspace technologies.  In summary, this vision would serve as a tangible location for the shared learning of electronic music production, while helping to put Baltimore on the map as a community mecca for music producers.

For now, to those who wish to take their music production to the next step, Daniel can travel to you or connect via Skype for one-on-one, personalized training.  You can access all the required information as well as his other offerings on Deeply Subjective Music’s website at  www.deeplysubjectivemusic.com

David London

David is a writer and artist in the MD/DC/VA area. He runs the Circus of Wonders and performs surreal magic shows all over the country.

Philip Laubner

Philip is a writer and portrait photographer based in Baltimore.

  • Dmerrill7612

    NICE!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=713409096 Sue Brunt

    Great article about a great musician.

  • http://twitter.com/mommasoto Alma Soto

    Great article and awesome music. Continued success! 

  • Thomas lee

    Great article.